Link-Building – Performancing http://performancing.com Tue, 13 Feb 2018 03:14:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 11 Myths About Link Building In SEO http://performancing.com/myths-about-link-building-in-seo/ http://performancing.com/myths-about-link-building-in-seo/#comments Wed, 10 May 2017 08:12:12 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=13830 Link building is one of the cornerstones of SEO and essential to rank for most competitive search terms. Doing link building the wrong way can quickly get your website into trouble and many websites and business have gone from the top of the SERPs to almost bust overnight due to the wrong link strategies so people […]

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Link building is one of the cornerstones of SEO and essential to rank for most competitive search terms. Doing link building the wrong way can quickly get your website into trouble and many websites and business have gone from the top of the SERPs to almost bust overnight due to the wrong link strategies so people are naturally cautious. This has also lead to many myths about link building spreading across SEO blogs, forums and social media over the years and this article is going to put a few of them straight. 

Links from directories do not have any value

Back in the old SEO days when link building involved submitting your website to as many places as possible directories were high up on the list as a main place for getting links from. When people started to spam this tactic too much and many link directories started to lower the standards of what they accepted or even let any website add it’s link with no oversight things started to get out of hand. Many directories deemed to be low quality or simply for the purpose of adding links were heavily penalized by Google and then after the Penguin updates people quickly stopped using them.

However, this does not mean that all directories are bad. Like with all links it depends on what the quality of the site is and what it’s doing. If there is a website run specifically for businesses in your local area with a directory and they are accepting listings and vetting them  then by all means you should be looking to get a link from that site. As with all link building, use your judgement and analyse the quality of the site beforehand.

Getting links too fast will get you penalised

Another myth and one which even seasoned SEOs believe! There is some truth to this though, if you create a new website or publish a new page and then get a lot of links with the same anchor text or text that is overly optimised for search terms than Google may not see these links as natural as when a link is truly built naturally it is normally not using your target search terms! However, if your business happens to blow up in the news or a piece of content goes viral and suddenly you are getting lots of links then this is fine and Google can tell that they are natural. So yes if you are doing forced, low quality link building too quickly then expect them to either not count at all or for Google to come after you, otherwise you’re fine.

Don’t link out to too many sites

This is something else that did have some truth to it in the past but in the last few years Google has stated is not true anymore. Many years ago in the Google webmaster guidelines it said “Keep the links on a give page to a reasonable number (fewer than 100)”, however people took this as a web spam rule and soon after 100 was the benchmark figure a page should not go over for outbound links. Matt Cutts helpfully cleared this up in 2009 though explaining that this was more of a user experience guideline which is why it was not listed in the web spam section.

“Does Google automatically consider a page spam if your page has over 100 links? No, not at all”

Matt Cutts, 2009

Even though the advice was dropped from the guidelines in 2008, Google publicly reinforced this in 2013 but also added a note that they make take action against that page if there were signs of obvious manipulation and/or spam.

Do not ask for links at all as it will get you penalised

This is not true but again it does share similarities with other situations where companies have offered discounts on their products and services or even free samples in return for links. If Google sees a website or company doing this on any kind of large scale they will see it as manipulative and most likely issue a penalty and warning.

However doing general outreach to niche related sites and asking them to link back to you is just fine. If a website has a resources page and you have something that you feel would be a good fit for that page then by all means ask them to add it.

This will *not* happen if you ask for links

Don’t get links from sites with less authority than you

As long as a site has quality content and isn’t spamming then the link is still valuable to you if its DA 50 or 20 site. Of course links from higher authority sites will carry more weight but lower ones can still help especially if the content is closely related to your site, don’t turn your nose up at them!

More than one link from the same domain has no value

Getting links from as many different domains as possible is of course desirable for any webmaster or link builder. Getting a second or third link from a domain that has already linked to you may not help you as much as the first link did but it still passes value in the same way other links do. If Forbes.com was linking to you multiple times from their site would you be upset? Of course not.

Links from non-related sites will not help

Your priority target sites should be sites related to your industry but it doesn’t mean that links from other niches will not pass value and help your rankings.

Link building is an independent strategy

This is another hangover from how SEO was done in the past and before the rise of content marketing. Any modern day SEO or content marketer knows that these two fields now go hand-in-hand. High quality and useful content is integral to nearly all link building campaigns especially if you want to attract links organically (without having to do manual outreach) and if you are planning a piece of content that you are hoping will get links naturally and/or you want to use for outreach to get links then making that piece of content as stand out as possible should be your main priority. If you have an attention grabbing piece of content that is head and shoulders above your competition then this will do a lot for the work for you!

 Reciprocal link building will always get you penalised

No it will not. If you link to a site that happens to link back to you by chance or even intentionally then Google will not have a problem with it. However, if they see you conducting what looks like a reciprocal link scheme where there are many sites and you are all linking to each other then they will take action.

I’m sure you are beginning to see a pattern here now, don’t spam, Google isn’t stupid!

Links are permanent

You may have heard people say thins like ‘pay per click is temporary, SEO is forever’ and there is some truth to this, although SEO takes a lot longer to achieve results the affects can last for a long time and organic SERP results historically have a much better click through rate than PPC search ads. However this does not mean that if you build XX number of links for a website that those links are still going to be there in a few months or a year later. Editors may remove links or entire pieces of content, websites are bought or shutdown, businesses may go bust and there are numerous other reasons that any number of highly valuable links to your website disappear overnight. Link building should never be a ‘set it and forget it’ strategy and should be on-going which is adds further emphasis to why it needs to be baked into your overall content and digital marketing strategies.

Nofollow links have no value

As we covered here in a previous post nofollow links should actually be part of your linking strategy to ensure that your link profile looks natural as Google does not like to see too many followed links and you want to have a link portfolio with a good mix of followed and nofollow links. Some SEOs and content marketers these days even say that you shouldn’t even think about whether a link is follow or nofollow and instead focus on reaching out to the right websites and people.

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How to Do Internal Linking the Right Way http://performancing.com/how-to-do-internal-linking-right-way/ http://performancing.com/how-to-do-internal-linking-right-way/#comments Wed, 10 May 2017 03:11:29 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=14023 Internal Linking and SEO Best Practices One of the great things about raising your visibility through search engine optimization is that you can get a lot of link juice with a few simple changes to how your produce and present your content. One well-known way of improving your SEO is through external links from relevant, […]

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Internal Linking and SEO Best Practices

One of the great things about raising your visibility through search engine optimization is that you can get a lot of link juice with a few simple changes to how your produce and present your content. One well-known way of improving your SEO is through external links from relevant, popular sites that point to your content. A method of improving your SEO that’s a little less understood is internal linking and its many benefits. If you aren’t including internal links in your webpages, you’re losing out on what could be a substantial boost in your Google rank.

 

What is Internal Linking?

An internal link is a link on your website that points to another page hosted on your website. For example, if a blog post on your page references a product you’re selling, you could link to that product. You could also link to your homepage, frequently asked questions or another post that sheds light on a topic mentioned in the one with the link. The important thing about internal linking is that the source and target link are on the same domain.

 

What’s the Point of Internal Linking?

Internal links serve a few different purposes on your website. For one, they create a roadmap of your site that helps people navigate. A clear webpage structure makes a better customer experience. Another thing they do is educate your visitors on what topic you’re writing about. Sometimes concepts are too complex to be explained in a single post, and linking to another can help your visitor find more information to clear things up.

These links also help create more links on your site, which can benefit your Google rank and help make your site more visible to interested searchers. One of the major benefits of internal linking is its ability to make more of your pages indexed, which is another way to increase your visibility. 

 

Internal Links and Google Crawlers

Google indexes the web with robots called crawlers. They go to a website and index the content, then follow links to new pages to index those as well. When content is indexed, it is available to searchers on Google.

Internal linking gives the crawlers a new way to find pages on your website. It creates links for them to follow. It helps Google index your pages and display them in search results, which increases your potential visibility. Since Google only updates their indexed content so often, creating new links to your pages may increase the rate of refresh for your site.

 

 

Internal Linking provides crawlers a way to find other pages on your website.

Internal Links and Crawl Limits

When designing an internal linking strategy, keep in mind that search engine crawlers have limits to the amount of links they can crawl. Google recommends that you keep the number of links to a few thousand at most, as of 2017. In the past, however, Matt Cutts of Google recommended keeping links on a page to less than 100, Google dropped this recommendation later in 2008 but also reinforced that they would take action if a page was deemed to be linking out for spam purposes. 

When linking internally it is also important to keep your crawl budget in mind. This is the number of pages on your site that Google bots are able to crawl.

 

What is Your Crawl Budget and Why You Need To Know This

what is your crawl budget

 

Since you also want to keep the page looking natural and not like it was link-stuffed, go easy on the internal links. Link totals include every link on the page, including the header, footer and any sidebars. If you can work in two or three internal links in a few thousand words, you’re doing the right thing.

That’s not to say that there aren’t times when more internal links are useful. If you’re setting up an index page or doing an overview of a topic to help people find more in-depth articles, link away. But in general, go easy on the internal links. Just a few to help readers and crawlers find their way to new pages can do wonders for your website navigation and SEO.

 

Types of Internal Links to Use

Use links in places where there is a convincing connection between the two pages. Ask yourself: is this relevant enough that a reader would want to click the link to see more information about it.

Use links that reach deep within the content of your site, not only links to the surface. While a link to your homepage is technically an internal link, it’s unlikely that it will deliver the same search engine optimization benefits as a link into deeper content, like blog posts or answers to reader’s questions that have been submitted to the site.

 

Types of Internal Links to Avoid

One type of link to avoid is a nofollow link. Since crawlers are using the link to get deeper into your site and index more pages, nofollow links counteract this. Crawlers generally only continue to the next page when the link is formatted as a follow link. Google doesn’t like to see webmasters doing this as it looks like ‘page rank sculpting’ which is when you try and force Google bots to only flow to certain pages to boost their value. 

“Nofollow is probably never the answer, especially on your own site. I can think of corner case scenarios where the target page would be robotted for whatever reason, and then if it is robotted and not indexed yet, if you don’t want to get that page indexed, then you probably don’t want to point to it with anchors”

Gary Illyes, Google

Matt Cutts did say back in 2013 though that its ok to nofollow a link to a page that contains something such as a login form:

 

 

Don’t have your internal links be the same on every page. Most webpages have a setup where links to major content are linked on every page. Examples include: contact us, the homepage or business hours. Avoid the mistake of making no variation.

Some examples of links that won’t be crawled are:

  • Links kept behind forms won’t be indexed. Crawlers won’t submit forms.
  • Some links are only accessible through an on-site search. These won’t be indexed. This is one of the most common causes of links not being crawled.
  • Flash, Java and similar plugins can prevent crawlers from accessing the links on them.
  • Links in certain types of Javascript won’t be crawled. It’s almost always better to use normal HTML links.

As you build internal links, decide what you want to focus on. You can focus on spreading many internal links through your site. Another strategy is promoting certain pieces of well-written content on many different pages. Either way, work to structure your links so they’ll be crawled. Your site will benefit from the new links and crawlers may find pages they haven’t before.

 

Internal Linking and SEO

Internal linking combines some of the most important components of search engine optimization into one task: linking, content, indexing, and refresh rates. Though you won’t get the same juice as you would from an external link from a high-authority site, you still get a boost when Google crawls and indexes your pages more often.

When your search engine optimization is increased, you’ll see your Google rank climb. Since pages at the top of Google’s search results for a term get significantly more traffic than those lower on the list, it’s worth the effort you put in to increase your rank.

Internal linking can also help increase your traffic and SEO by returning more of your pages in search results. More links mean more crawling means more pages indexed by Google. Those indexed pages can be returned in searches for the keywords you’re targeting. In that way, your site may rise above one that doesn’t use internal linking.

 

Internal Links and Reader Engagement

Another benefit of internal linking is that you can increase reader engagement. A good link structure will make your site and content easier to navigate for readers. One benefit is that a clear link to supplementary content will add value. Adding value will make your site more appealing to a visitor.

The easier and more helpful your site, the more interested people will be in returning to it later. Since returning visitors are more likely to make a purchase on your site, it pays to keep people coming back again. This is another reason why fresh content is essential and helps an internal linking strategy–it keeps people coming back and following links to your pages, establishing you as an authority and building the trust that inspires people to purchase products or services.

 

Internal Links and Niche Authority

Linking to your own material can also help increase your own authority in your niche. While linking to outside websites also has value, you show that you know your stuff when you use internal links properly. Since building your niche authority can help you build relationships with other businesses, attract customers, and offer external link trading capabilities, it’s good to position your brand as an expert.

Pages that define terms, elaborate on mentioned concepts, or highlight some area of expertise that you excel in can position you as an authority. Linking to those exposes your brand knowledge and awareness to other people. If you have more relevant and substantive content on your site, they know that you know as much or more than your competition.

 

Creating Linkable Content

One trick to internal linking is to create lots of content. The more content, the more potential links and places to link on your site. Since updating your content regularly helps improve your Google rank, increasing the content production on your website is a good idea for more reasons than one anyway.

To create content that is easy to make relevant links to, take a look at your old posts and consider how they might connect to new content. Don’t force it, though. You don’t want to sacrifice the quality or readability of your content to link to other pages on your site.

If you already have a lot of content that isn’t linked, go through and update it to add links to relevant pages. To make it natural, consider adding a sentence or two to refresh the old content when you revisit it. Add the link in the new content. In this way, you’re making it fit naturally and it will be easier to read.

 

Formatting Internal Links

Always format internal links the right way. Not doing so many detract from their benefits. The link structure you’re creating is designed to help Google find and index pages on your website.

A normal, follow link should work perfectly fine with internal linking. Also, if you’re trying to get very good results for a particular page, consider making the link more visible. Place it in the content with a good anchor text: keep it succinct, relevant to the link, and don’t make your anchor text too keyword heavy.

Many websites are designed in such a way that Google can’t easily index their content. Having the pages linked the wrong way can inhibit the crawling activity. This keeps your site from being indexed and returning as a search result. If your pages aren’t linked properly, Google may not even know they exist. Google can’t return what it isn’t aware of in search results.

 

Keep Your Internal Links Relevant

Adding internal links to your website isn’t just about shoehorning them in where they fit. It’s important that they’re relevant to the content of the source page. Ask yourself whether the links adds value to the page. If it does–and is formatted and selected properly–then you have a perfect internal link. If it isn’t, remove it and use a link that does give a reader more value.

Before placing a link, determine whether it’s relevant. Ask yourself whether you’d find it interesting and educational if you were reading the page. Picture yourself as a customer and ask whether that link would seem natural and useful to you. If you think it would be, then add it to your page.

If you aren’t already using internal links in your content, start today. It’s a simple and easy way to increase reader engagement and improve your search engine position. On top of that, it makes your site more easy to navigate and can supplement your content.

As you work to increase your position as a brand authority, internal linking should become a commonplace feature of your site. The benefits over time will be substantial.

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How To Do Content Outreach (The Right Way) http://performancing.com/how-to-do-content-outreach-right-way/ http://performancing.com/how-to-do-content-outreach-right-way/#comments Wed, 26 Apr 2017 09:30:14 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=13858 When you’re trying to build a brand, outreach is one of your most valuable tools. As you link up with other reputable sites, your own reputation online improves and you gain more content authority. Unfortunately, it can take a lot of outreach to build a few solid relationships. Approaching people the right way can improve […]

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When you’re trying to build a brand, outreach is one of your most valuable tools. As you link up with other reputable sites, your own reputation online improves and you gain more content authority. Unfortunately, it can take a lot of outreach to build a few solid relationships. Approaching people the right way can improve your chances of making those connections. Before you begin, make sure to have a strategy that will warrant a positive response.

What is Content Outreach?

Content outreach is how you make contacts and get them to share and promote your content. There are a few kinds of content outreach to be aware of. One is just contacting the owner of a popular blog or site and having them share your website via a link. Another is having your content tweeted, shared on Facebook or posted on another social media site by a reputable blogger or brand. Another is guest blogging, where you create content for a different site; the content you create would promote you as an expert and also point back to your own site.

 
 

How Does Content Outreach Benefit My Brand?

Content outreach has three major benefits for your brand. The first is that it can position you as an expert in your field. When people with brand authority quote you, promote you and share you on their own sites, it shows potential customers that you can be trusted. The more you engage in the community for your brand, the more you’ll be visible and reputable.

The second is that it offers SEO benefits. The more links you have back to your content, the higher you’ll appear in Google search results. When your links appear on the pages of respected, frequently-updated and authoritative sites, you’ll see a boost in your sites authority. That’s one of the reasons why content outreach is so important. The higher you appear in Google search results, the more clicks you get.

The third benefit is organic outreach. People who are reading the pages where your content is shared may click the link and visit your site. If your content is up-to-date, interesting and relevant, they may share to their own communities or return to your site later to get more information or pay for products or services. That’s one reason why it’s so important to try to connect with reputable, respected sites and people.

 
 

Who Should I Contact?

Obviously, the more high-profile and respected the person you contact, the better. However, if you’re reaching out to people like Matt Cutts to get links about SEO, you’re probably not going to get a response. You need to find a good balance between the high-profile, well-respected contact and the contact who will actually reply to you.

There are basically four groups of people to consider.

  1. High-level experts with a large audience. For example Rand Fishkin of Moz.
  2. Less well-known, but still authoritative people with a more moderate audience.
  3. People who are just getting on the radar in your community. They’re also working to actively gain a larger audience by promoting themselves and being active in their niche.
  4. Sites with no major audience that isn’t niche-specific and isn’t self-promoting.

Though it can be difficult to contact a high-level expert, the exception to this is if you have a personal connection to them. If you do, use it to reach out and you may get a lot of return in the form of new traffic. When your site is shared by someone with a lot of influence, it could mean many new visitors. If you don’t have a personal in, however, it’s better to focus your efforts elsewhere.

Focus on the people who are less well-known and those that are actively promoting themselves to have a better chance of connecting and getting some type of content share. One way to think of it is to consider how many unsolicited emails a given person must receive. The more they get, the more likely they are to skip over your outreach.

When deciding where to focus your efforts, consider using a tool like Moz’s Site Explorer to check the page authority and what kind of links your target produces. That way you can be sure you’ll get the most return for your effort.

Of course, using the right strategies will improve your response rate.

 
 

How to Identify Contacts

If you’re new to content outreach, start small by looking for blogs that accept guest posts. A simple Google search can unearth many blogs that take guest posts, submissions and other types of content that you’ll be able to post along with a link to your own website. If you’re interested in contacting these blogs, be prepared to create a new post to publish on their sites.

To reach out to influential bloggers and people on your niche, look for their contact information on their websites. Avoid using the contact form embedded on the website, since it can be less targeted. Instead, find their contact information and send them a personalized email that includes your content, what you can offer and what you’re hoping to get.

If there’s no contact information on a website, look for a profile page. You can also look up site owners on social media like Facebook or LinkedIn. It’s best to try to find a professional page or one associated with their site, rather than contacting them on a personal account.

Finally, each site has its information published online. You can often find a contact email if you search for the domain information.

 

 

 

“It’s easier to be real than to fake being real”

Matt Cutts, Google

How to Approach Your Contact

The first step in approaching someone is to make sure you have their information correct. Double check their name, email address and the spelling and capitalization of their website. First impressions matter; it’s important to look professional and competent. Before you send the email, too, you should go back over all the pertinent details and make sure that you’ve covered all your bases.

Address the person and introduce yourself if you haven’t met them before. If you have, refresh them on who you are and where you met. Explain where you’ve seen them or found out about them if applicable. For example, if you’ve read their articles, used their apps or watched videos they’ve produced, mention it.

Explain what you want to share with them. Whether it’s your best blog post, the results of a customer survey, or analysis of your website traffic, send them a link to the information you’re hoping they’ll share.

Ask for what you want, whether it’s feedback or a boost to a larger audience. Keep in mind that you’re more likely to get feedback than an immediate content share—and the person will share it in any case if they find it interesting. Sometimes it’s better to not ask for the boost and instead appeal to the person’s expertise by asking for feedback instead. This is the case when you’re writing to someone who’s significantly more influential than you currently are. Asking for a critique may be met with a better response, but it will still get your link in front of that person. In the same token, someone on the same level as you who’s actively working on building their brand may be more open to a content exchange.

Thank them for their time, and sign the email. Keep it short and sweet—it’s better to get to the point quickly than to ramble on and lose the person’s attention. An executive research firm tracked their emails for five years and found that short emails get quicker responses.

 

 

Offer Something Unique

The best way to get a return on your time is to offer something unique to the person you contact. For example, if you have some kind of information that they haven’t seen before, offer to share it with them. This could lead to a click from the person you’re trying to make an impression on because they’ll want to read the study you’ve conducted or the data you’ve gathered.

If you’ve built an interesting tool, share it with them. Don’t wait to share the most interesting things about your brand and what you can offer until you’ve made contact. Offer that information right away so that you increase your chances of getting noticed and being able to share your content.

Keep in mind that a popular person could get multiple emails every day and won’t be able to respond to or feature everyone. If you figure out what makes responding to you worth that person’s time, you’re halfway toward developing a relationship with them that will help you market your brand.

It may seem like it takes more time to offer something unique in a targeted, personalized way–but it will pay off when you’re seeing more positive responses than negative ones.

 

 

 

Five Ways to Get Noticed

  • Personalize the email – Address the person by name and the entire contact will seem more personable and approachable. You’ll stand out in a sea of emails that aren’t geared directly to the person receiving it. For example, personalized emails in marketing get six times higher responses than those that don’t personalize, but most marketers still don’t personalize. Doing so will help you stand out.
  • Give a little bit about you in the email – Since you may not be known to the person you’re contacting, it will help give you a little authority and show why the person will want to work with you. James Smith is just a person. James Smith with a degree in marketing who runs operations for a web startup is someone with a background and knowledge on a topic that may interest the person to whom you’re writing.
  • Target your content to the person you’re contacting – If you can work in a quote or a mention of something they’re trying to market, they may be more interested in clicking the link you send. People want to get something out of the interaction. If you offer relevant content, you’ll stand out from the people who send out less targeted links.
  • Find out who influences your ultimate targets and then create relationships with those people – You can use a tool like Followerwonk to see who the person you want to work with follows to get an idea of what interests that person. Once you have an idea of who to they follow, determine whether those people would be receptive to your outreach. If they’re too high in your niche to respond to you, consider looking at who they quote and what they share. Those sites may have people who would be receptive to working with you. It’s all about learning who’s influential in your niche, what sites are on the rise and who the most dominant figures in the industry are keeping an eye on.
  • If you want to complement their content or site, do it in a measurable, active way –  Say that you’ve tweeted it, shared it or that it gave you a different perspective on a topic, for example. Simply saying it’s “interesting” or “good” won’t be as compelling. Many people will give generic compliments. Make yours active and specific.

 

Content Outreach Mistakes to Avoid

  • Don’t be too arrogant or demanding – Be confident in your site, abilities, and links, but beware. If you come off as too arrogant, the person may not be interested in working with you. Being humble and quietly confident means asking for feedback. This is better than demanding that the person looks at your link and shares it right then. Keep in mind that you’re asking for a favor.
  • Don’t let your email look like spam – Writing the same outreach email over and over may cause it to look like spam. It’s another case where personalization can be the difference between the person clicking “delete” or “reply”.
  • Don’t use every article on your blog for outreach – Pick the best articles with the freshest ideas and most original content. That way, you have the best chance of being picked up and shared.

 

Content outreach can help you increase your authority and visibility in your niche. By networking with other professionals and exchanging content or links, you’re making your website more influential. Content outreach is a long term strategy, so don’t get bogged down worrying about the people who decline. Eventually, the effort will pay off with better search ranks and more hits on your blog. As your reputation increases, you may one day find yourself fielding outreach offers more than you send them out.

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6 Link Building Tips For Local SEO http://performancing.com/6-link-building-tips-local-seo/ http://performancing.com/6-link-building-tips-local-seo/#comments Fri, 13 May 2016 08:48:03 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=13224 If you are looking to get into the crucial local ‘3-pack’ on Google then you are going to need not just great reviews and feedback from the locals but also excellent links. Here’s 6 tips on how to get them. Reach out to local bloggers This should actually be your first port of call, reach […]

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If you are looking to get into the crucial local ‘3-pack’ on Google then you are going to need not just great reviews and feedback from the locals but also excellent links. Here’s 6 tips on how to get them.

Reach out to local bloggers

This should actually be your first port of call, reach out to bloggers and publications in your area and let them know about your business. Keep in mind that the bigger the blog or website the more emails they will be getting each day so don’t be surprised if you don’t get an immediate reply! If you have some unique information or data on the local area that relates to your business then ask them if they would like this data written up into a blog post that they can publish. If you are organizing an event (see below) then let them know about it and don’t forget to invite them!

Extra tip: Offer some free exposure to the blog or publication at your event and they will most likely do the same in return. This doesn’t have to be reciprocal linking though, they could have their logo on the sides of the cups people use or t-shirts could be given out with their brand on and in return they blog about the event!

Attend an event or meetup

You should always be networking so this is a no-brainer. Go to as many SME meetups as you can as well as any others related to your industry. Talk to people, grab business cards and start following these people on social media. Check out Meetup.com to find out whats going on in your areas as well as the local press.

Host your own event

If no events related to your business are being held in your local area then this is a prime opportunity to get more exposure and media mentions along with all the links that come with it! This doesn’t have to be a formal event either, a social gathering at times such as Christmas or Easter for people in the local community will also work.

Create a resource page

Put together an awesome page of content on something really useful to local people in the area, if you run a wine business then what about an infographic map of all the best Italian restaurants in the area? If you have an outdoors shop then a list post on all the best biking & running trails locally would go down a storm with fitness enthusiasts, don’t forget to share across your social channels and even look at some extra paid boosting on Facebook to help it go viral!

Sponsor a team

Not a major sports team of course but a school sports team or similar would happily welcome additional funds to pay for kit and other expenses. You can then get offline visibility as well as links from there website (most minor teams have these now).

Local directory sites

This is also another no-brainer but people often forget about. Make sure you add your website to as many local directory listings as possible.

A/B Testing and SEO: What You Need to Know to Succeed

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Link Building: Determining the Value of a Link http://performancing.com/link-building-determining-the-value-of-a-link/ Fri, 02 Mar 2012 13:30:42 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=10831 Link building is an important part of any SEO campaign. Building links has the effect of sending our websites direct traffic, while at the same time signalling Google that our website is important. The latter leads to increased crawl rate, and optimally increased rankings. In nutrition, we realize that overall health and fat loss is […]

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link building

Link building is an important part of any SEO campaign. Building links has the effect of sending our websites direct traffic, while at the same time signalling Google that our website is important. The latter leads to increased crawl rate, and optimally increased rankings.

In nutrition, we realize that overall health and fat loss is not a simple measure of calories in minus calories out. Consuming 200 calories worth of fresh fish and vegetables will certainly decrease body fat faster than consuming 200 calories of ice cream.

The same is true in link building. Increasing our page authority entails building quality, relevant links from high authority websites. There is a difference between receiving a link from The New York Times and receiving a link from your college buddy’s blog with 10 followers.

In this article we examine the SEO basics of valuing a prospective link.

Begin with Pagerank

PageRank is Google’s measure of a website’s authority and importance. The scale is from 1 to 10, but is not linear. Moving up from 1 to 2 is much easier than moving up from 6 to 7. Named after Larry Page, Google PageRank is measured internally within Google, but updated very infrequently to the public.

This creates a conundrum for link builders. The ranking we are allowed to see may be vastly different than the internal ranking. This is especially true with websites which are “moving quickly.” They may have been brand new a few months ago, but have built a substantial following since.

Determining how popular or authoritative a website is becomes more art than science. There are a number of data sources we can tap to estimate how important a link might be from a website. For instance traffic estimates from Alexa or Compete can help with sites which have experienced high traffic for at least a couple of months.

In recent years, social media has become important source of data. How many followers does the website have? How much discussion revolves around them? Are people regularly linking to them using social media?

There are third party tools which provide a rough approximation of Google PageRank, but these often seem to me to be akin to the blind man feeling the elephant analogy. The bottom line is it more art than science, and it will take multiple sources to piece together a rough approximation of a website’s authority.

But it needn’t be so difficult. If you have to look hard to determine if a website has high authority, then it likely it does not have it. Obvious high authority should hit you square in the jaw. High authority blogs have a large following, and many times an active commenting community. High authority websites are linked to frequently, and talked about across the web.

Outbound Links

Once you determine how authoritative a webpage is, you should next look at the number of outbound links on the webpage. The amount of link juice a webpage sends is divided among the outbound links. So if there are 3 links on the page, each link will receive 1/3 of the benefit.

This becomes a major issue with lists and directories. A webpage with hundreds of outbound links is probably not worth the effort, no matter how authoritative their domain is.

Matt Cutts discusses this on his YouTube channel below:

Relevancy

I’m not sure how to quantify this with a number, but I am certain that links from an irrelevant webpage will not pass much authority if any. The link to your own webpage should have a relation to the content on the linking page, and optimally to the content of the entire domain.

Domain Trust

Again, this is difficult to quantify. A domain may have many links point toward it, but that doesn’t make the domain trustworthy. If you are Google, do you value a link from a spammy gossip website more than a link from an Ivy League university, even if the gossip website has more inbound links?

I avoid seeking a link from any website with a very spammy look to it, pop up windows, or questionable advertising and content.

Fresh Material

This is especially obvious with blogs. I have received offers to post blogs with websites with decent PageRank values, but ultimately declined because of a lack of fresh material. PageRank is a snap shot in time, and does not offer you information as to whether the velocity is positive or negative. Assume with any website lacking fresh content that the PageRank is stagnant or in decline.

When targeting a blog, or any article rich website, ensure that the articles are updated on a regular basis. Infrequent updates not only sends you a red flag that the website authority is in decline, it also sends a message to Google that the search engine need not crawl the website frequently. Therefor any new link posted may take a while before Google notices it.

Guest Blogging

The actual process of link building is worth several posts of their own. However one of the most effective methods you can use is guest blogging. Guest blogging gives the website a reason to link to you, as it is in exchange for the valuable content that you are providing.

What I really like about guest blogging is that you expose a large audience to your knowledge of a subject, and give them a reason to want to learn more about you. The catch is, you need to be able to write effective articles and express yourself through the written word. If you don’t feel comfortable with this, you can hire writers to produce content for you.

Summary

Link building should begin with identifying high authority websites with content which is related to our website. The website should be trustworthy, if you expect the link to have its maximum effectiveness. You should also consider the number of outbound links on the page, as the link juice will be divided among them.

About the Author

Dan Padavona is the lead web designer for Warmpicture Royalty Free Stock Photography. His blog covers the business of photography, and SEO advice for photographers wishing to start their own websites.

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Picking And Choosing Guest Posting Opportunities http://performancing.com/picking-and-choosing-guest-posting-opportunities/ http://performancing.com/picking-and-choosing-guest-posting-opportunities/#comments Sat, 05 Nov 2011 06:19:12 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=10523 Not all guest posts were created equal. Guests posts offer a variety of different advantages for your blog – one that isn’t summed up with just one Internet marketing strategy like providing your web site with more “link juice” or getting a trickle of traffic because of your opportunities. No – guest blogging is more […]

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Not all guest posts were created equal. Guests posts offer a variety of different advantages for your blog – one that isn’t summed up with just one Internet marketing strategy like providing your web site with more “link juice” or getting a trickle of traffic because of your opportunities. No – guest blogging is more than just that.

There are many blogs out there that are strictly dedicated to the idea of guest blogging and what it can do for your website. It is something of a huge phenomina in which whole websites were created for to help people find better and more guest blogging opportunities. It is a marketing strategy that has taken hold of the SEO and it seems as if it might be here to stay for a while because of all the benefits it provides, not only the people that are doing the guest posting, but websites that are created from guest posting.

In fact there are many websites out there that get 100% of their content strictly from outside sources such as guest posting. Guest posting has affected the Internet world like nothing we have ever seen before. Here are a concepts of what guest posting actually is and what guest posting actually does for your web site.

  • Branding
  • High Powered Networking
  • Gains Exposure
  • Link building
  • Traffic Building

When Should You Guest Post and When You Shouldn’t

Not all guest posts, not all blogs, and not all networks were created equal. One of the “golden rules” of link building is that if you can receive traffic from a link, then it is probably best to build that link. The same can be said with guest posting but I would argue that you should take it a little bit farther and only guest post if you get substantial traffic from that guest post.

Now, substantial traffic can mean many different things. It all really depends on where you are at in terms of the strength of your web site at the moment, and if you are barely getting traffic in the first place, then getting more guest posts whenever you have the opportunity to obviously will make a little more sense.

How Do You Get the Most Traffic From Your Guest Posts?

Your guest posts, since you are posting on another website, and in a lot of cases a website that may perhaps get A LOT more traffic than your website, have to be some of the best content you can come up with. If you are going to want to convert a lot of the traffic you get, into normal and frequent visitors, then you need to make sure that your guest posts are top notch quality.

First thing is first. Do not look at blogs solely as metrics that your SEO Quake Bar feeds you. There are many Page Rank 2 (and even 1 in some cases) blogs and websites out their that can provide amazing benefits to your website out their and there are also many different PageRank 3,4 and even 5 blogs out there that would not provide as much value to your website. PageRank is not a magic number – I try to stress this fact as much as possible.

There are many different other factors when picking and choosing yuor guest posting opportunities other than page rank.

  • Is your article going to have a chance to rank at the top of the SERPs?
  • Does the website have a solid base of readership?
  • Is the website getting a lot comments on each blog post?
  • When was the last time the website got updated?
  • How is the quality of the content on the blog? Is the web site actually providing value on the Internet or is it more of a content farm?
  • How relevant is the web site? Are these the types of visitors that you are going to be able to turn in to frequent visitors?
  • Is the site a good target for cross promotional strategies?

As you can see, there are many different reasons that you should do a guest post on a web site. To get the best results, you should look for websites that have very positive results in terms of the criteria mentioned above. You should also do a lot of research for what it is that you would like the article to rank for.

When approaching guests posts from this angle, you should definitely approach each and every one like you approach your own web site. You should get a set of keywords that you would like to aim at ranking for and then you should sprinkle them throughout your content.

If you can maximize the amount of traffic your guest posts gets, you can maximize the traffic you will get, and also the amount of people that link to your site and that guest pot naturally – will add a lot of “link juice” to your site. Like posting on your own site however – it all starts with the quality of your content.

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Interview With an Online Marketer and Link Builder http://performancing.com/interview-with-an-online-marketer-and-link-builder/ http://performancing.com/interview-with-an-online-marketer-and-link-builder/#comments Thu, 30 Jun 2011 09:00:43 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=10387 Ready for a peek around the other side of the desk?  as a blogger you are likely approached by link builders. But what do they really do on a regular basis?  This interview will take you through the ups and downs you can expect in the position, what it takes to land the job, what […]

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Ready for a peek around the other side of the desk?  as a blogger you are likely approached by link builders. But what do they really do on a regular basis?  This interview will take you through the ups and downs you can expect in the position, what it takes to land the job, what you can expect to earn and more. This is a true career story told anonymously, to get you closer to the truth about this line of work.

What is your job title? How many years of experience do you have in that field?

My official job title is link builder, i.e. I optimize search engine results for different websites. I have been working as a link builder for almost one year.

Would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I work from home, so after having breakfast I log in to the main dash board where I am able to view the work plan for each site I optimize. I assign, proofread and publish articles on different online magazines. Then I search for possible link partners, and send them emails asking them to place links to my sites.

What is your ethnicity? How has it hurt or helped you?

My father was a white American and my mother is a Peruvian Hispanic, therefore I consider myself a mix. As I grew up I believed this to be a negative thing, but as I have matured I’ve learned to appreciate my ability to understand both races and cultures; once I learned to embrace my background, I realized I had double the opportunities.

If you’ve experienced discrimination, in what ways have you responded and what response worked best?

Initially I felt upset whenever I felt discriminated as a Latino and tried to fight back by speaking my mind. After many years I realized the best response was to be tolerant and humble, as I was able to concentrate more on my own happiness rather than trying to change someone else’s mind.

What languages do you speak? How has speaking another language helped you?

I speak English and Spanish. After graduating college, I was asked to translate marketing material on my first internship. I realized it was something I could do easily and enjoyed; therefore, I continued writing and translating. Having done this has opened many doors in my career.

What did you learn the hard way in this job and how did that happen?

It took me a while to understand the importance of each URL. As I searched for new links throughout the web, I would place incorrect URLs on letters and/or articles, making me lose time and money.

What don’t they teach in school that would’ve been helpful to you?

Humility. It changes the entire perspective on life and work. Being humble helps me appreciate things more, as well as work harder to get things I want, as I don’t take things for granted.

How did you get started in this line of work? If you could go back and do it differently, what would you change?

I began writing and translating for different websites, which taught me the importance of the internet as an advertising channel. If I could go back in time, I would listen more to the advice of my elders and people who love me.

On a good day, when things are going well, can you give an example of something that really makes you feel good?

Seeing how my sites’ rankings are improving is rewarding.

When nothing seems to go right, what kind of snafus do you handle and what do you dislike the most?

Sometimes websites go down, either the ones I promote or the ones I partner with, and I have to look for alternatives that will help me move forward. Other than this, I dislike having to tell my boss the mistakes I made.

How stressful is your job? Are you able to maintain a comfortable or healthy work-life balance?

I don’t find my job stressful. Working from home allows me to maximize my day depending on the different things I have to do, like pay bills, buy groceries, do exercise, take care of family, etc.

On a scale of 1 to 10 how would you rate your job satisfaction? What would it take to increase that rating?

I would rate my job satisfaction to a 9 only because I enjoy writing, which I’m not able to do as much. If I were to do more research and write about what I find, I would rate my job satisfaction a 10.

What’s the most rewarding moment you’ve experienced in this position? Of all the things you’ve done at work, what are you most proud of?

Some of the websites I manage have reached the first result in Google for the keywords I have optimized. This is rewarding. The thing I am most proud of is writing an article that people like and learn from, as well as motivates them to visit the site I am promoting.

What’s the most challenging moment you’ve experienced? What would you prefer to forget?

When I initially began working I was a little confused by the new terminology related to HTML. I want to forget the times I mixed the links to the different sites I managed and how I felt when I had to tell my boss the mistakes I had done.

What education and skills do you need to get hired and succeed in this field?

An understanding of HTML and how the internet works, as well as good communication skills are important as you’re always writing emails to people you don’t get to meet get face to face.

What would you tell a friend considering your line of work?

Ask them if they like to work independently and if they enjoy working with computers. I would also let them know the benefits of working from home (or any place they want).

How much vacation do you take? Is it enough?

The good thing about the job I have is that I can work from anywhere I want. Therefore I can go on vacation to where I want, take some days off and then continue to work wherever I’m at. After a couple of months, I can take some more vacation days.

Are there any common myths you want to correct about what you do?

Some people have called me a spammer for trying to find links to my sites. I don’t surf the internet looking for places where I can get free links. What I try to do is promote sites that benefit people ethically, without deceiving other people.

Does this job move your heart? If not, what does?

I find this job motivational because I promote sites that help other people find jobs. Helping others succeed and achieve their goals satisfies me.

If you could write your own ticket, what would you like to be doing in five years?

Writing allows me to investigate and learn new things, and teaching allows me to pass on the knowledge I acquire. Therefore I would like to write about things I like and teach at the same time.

Is there anything unique about your situation that readers should know when considering your experiences or accomplishments?

I’ve worked at different places and learned a lot from each one of them. However, I always wanted a job that would allow me to travel; therefore writing worked out for me. Not being able to find a travel writer job, doing SEO work allows me to work from different places, and I am able to write about the things I want in my spare time. I consider this very important, as I don’t have to write about things I’m not passionate about.

 

Guest Bio: As told to ‘LatPro.com  Learn’ – a collection of true career stories told by Hispanic and bilingual professionals including this high school department chair.

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Analyzing Competitor Information for Your Link Building Strategy http://performancing.com/analyzing-competitor-information-for-your-link-building-strategy/ http://performancing.com/analyzing-competitor-information-for-your-link-building-strategy/#comments Thu, 06 Jan 2011 10:00:04 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=10211 While creating a solid link building strategy can at times be overwhelming, with a good plan it should not be as difficult as it sounds. To begin, you always want to start with strong market research and competitive analysis. In other words, your best strategy will be to find out what the market wants and […]

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While creating a solid link building strategy can at times be overwhelming, with a good plan it should not be as difficult as it sounds. To begin, you always want to start with strong market research and competitive analysis. In other words, your best strategy will be to find out what the market wants and then design your strategy accordingly, rather than the other way around. A competitive analysis of the market lets you benchmark the best, strongest, and most worthwhile practices in your industry.

More established websites shouldn’t be seen as a threat. In fact, these can teach you a lesson or two. Indeed, studying competitor websites will give you an idea as to which link building strategies work, and which do not. Steps you can take include…

1. Contact websites that can link to you after finding out which sites links to your competitors. Contact these sites’ webmasters and ask them to link to yours.

2. Determine what sites can yield the best benefits – in general, the more “authority” a site has, the more valuable their link is. But it is also important not to overlook websites in the same niche as yours because they can deliver highly targeted traffic.

There are many tools that can help you determine which websites are best. Some of these are free while some asks for a certain fee. Some recommended tools include Majestic SEO and Open Site Explorer. A link graph that displays the interlinking among websites will let you see which sites contributes most to a competing site – these are the same links you want to get.

Take note that no single tool can let you get the complete picture (especially if the industry you’re analyzing is complex). The two tools mentioned above can get 1,000 link data which is usually sufficient for most uses. After you have identified which links has the most potential, the next step would be to contact the site webmasters. We have a few tips on how you can do this:

  • Keep the Message Short – most webmasters will understand what you’re trying to say. So when you send an email asking for a link, keep it short and to the point. They will respond if they are interested.
  • Customize the Email – make it a point to mention something unique about the webmaster’s website. Otherwise, they might consider your email as spam.
  • Emphasize a Benefit – people will take action if there’s something in it for them. What can you offer that will make linking to your site attractive to other webmasters?

Of course once you have done the following, it is the decision of the webmasters whether to link to your website or not.

All in all, don’t be intimidated by your competitors! Use their experience and the age of their site to teach you about how you go about your link building strategy, and in no time you’ll find yourself competing with them!

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5 Tips to Leverage Free Mobile Apps for Link-Building http://performancing.com/5-tips-to-leverage-free-mobile-apps-for-link-building/ http://performancing.com/5-tips-to-leverage-free-mobile-apps-for-link-building/#comments Wed, 26 May 2010 01:35:37 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=8735 WebTrafficROI has a very interesting link-building tip: create an iPhone Web app. They’re not talking a native iPhone app, which would take a lot more time and money, but rather a Web app that would run in the iPhone Safari browser. Why? Well free mobile apps (native or otherwise) are today’s hot freebie, assuming you’ve […]

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WebTrafficROI has a very interesting link-building tip: create an iPhone Web app. They’re not talking a native iPhone app, which would take a lot more time and money, but rather a Web app that would run in the iPhone Safari browser. Why? Well free mobile apps (native or otherwise) are today’s hot freebie, assuming you’ve done a good job. So WebTrafficROI suggests that you create a mobile Web app for the iPhone and then submit some PR to various sites that review or feature such apps. Their logic suggests that when a site covers your app, you’ll get an inbound link. Do this with enough sites and your search engine ranking will build.

Now while they’re absolutely right about that, and this is definitely a legitimate link-building technique, don’t be so sure you’ll get a lot of sites following through. I know from researching for my own mobile apps startup that while there are a growing number of mobile app review sites, many are either backlogged, some are not interested in mobile web apps. They also mention Apple as a site that features mobile apps. Again, this is true, though it’s not that easy getting featured. (I’ve heard tell that wooing some Apple employees with dinner might get you a contact name for getting featured, but that’s not necessarily true, and you’d have to live in Silicon Valley.)

Some Mobile-Related Link-Building Options

An iPhone and iPad are part of my blogging computing setup, and I think WebTrafficROI’s mobile approach to link-building is still a legitimate and good approach. They give you some mobile Web-specific tips for code to detect when an iPhone/ iPod Touch device is requesting a web page. However, I wanted to add to the conversation, and suggest a slightly broader approach. When it comes to what you can offer in the mobile space, here are some options, possibly overlapping with what WebTrafficROI wrote:

  1. A mobile version of your site with the same or similar functionality, but obviously geared towards a specific mobile device, possibly an iPhone. This is the simplest approach and often the least expensive.
  2. Offer a native mobile app with the same or similar functionality as your website.  There are some things your mobile Web app just cannot do, depending on what smartphone(s) you are targeting. (If you are promoting a blog, offer an app that provides a mobile view of your content. There are some development tools that make this very easy to do, provided your site has an RSS feed.)
  3. Offer both a mobile Web version and a native app. Presumably the latter would have additional features not available to the mobile Web version.
  4. Offer a mobile Web or mobile native app related to your niche.

For example, I’m working on two iPhone/ iPad apps that I’m hoping to give away in the future. One is for bloggers in any niche, a very broadly-scoped app. The other is Twitter-related but geared to the social media marketing side of things, so it should appeal to web-based entrepreneurs and small business owners. Each app’s release will have a different market but the same objective: build brand presence and back links for my mobile apps startup.

Considerations for Leveraging a Free Mobile App

If you do want to release a mobile app, Web or native, as part of a link-building strategy, here are some things you should consider, especially if you plan to offer a native mobile app instead of a mobile Web app.

  1. Partner up. You can partner with other bloggers to help cut the cost of development, or if the scope of your app is broad enough,  you might even partner up with a mobile app development studio (I’m partnered with two). In fact, you may need to partner if you don’t want to go through the effort of registering with Apple or Palm or Google, etc., as a developer — which in some cases costs money. The cost of using an app development studio can be defrayed by bartering your writing services, or offering advertising, or something else entirely.
  2. Target one platform. I might be biased but I’d say go with the Apple iPhone OS platform, which includes the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. (As a starting point in your research, you might want to check out SplashPressMedia’s AppleGazette blog and my CallStyle blog. I’ll share other links in the future, as appropriate) While the Google Android platform is gaining ground, the problem as I see it is fragmentation, with far too many handsets with different screen footprints.
  3. Go beyond free. If you’re giving away a free mobile Web or native app, great. But consider a paid premium native app with additional features. This might be one way to pay for development costs. You might not make a profit directly from the paid app, but if you achieve your objective of building back links, which in turn bring indirect revenue, then you’ve succeeded. Don’t forget that your blog can be your marketing vehicle.
  4. Brainstorm your app. Be sure of your objectives for the app. Who is the target user? What will it do? Will you support it by offering upgrades? Why are you creating it? For the latter, be completely honest with yourself. Just like web designers were giving away free WordPress themes in hopes of getting backlinks to their site, it’s okay if you’re doing this for the for the purpose of link-building.
  5. Have a marketing plan. Oh you didn’t that “they” would just come if you “built it”, did you? Create a list or spreadsheet of all the mobile sites that might feature your mobile app. They don’t have to all be about mobile apps or smartphones; they could be niche-specific. Have a press kit for your app, and include screen shots or links to video, a description of the app, your intent, your contact info, and whatever else is appropriate. Then systematically contact each site and offer them interview time, if they want it. While you are waiting to be covered (don’t necessarily expect a response to your email), move on to the next site in your list. Promote your app in Facebook and Twitter.

This is a very nutshell overview of how to leverage a mobile app for link-building. If there’s enough demand for covering more mobile topics as they relate to blogging and building an online presence, I’ll do so. I do have a couple of mobile-related posts up my sleeve for the near future, so keep an eye out.

Via: WebTrafficROI.

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The Two Core Principles to Building Quality Links http://performancing.com/the-two-core-principles-to-building-quality-links/ http://performancing.com/the-two-core-principles-to-building-quality-links/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2009 07:01:38 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=7187 I like to keep things simple when it comes to building quality links. If you make link building too complicated, you can often over analyze and overthink things that you don’t get much done. Most of my quality links have come from applying these two simple principles. Connecting I like what Aaron Wall at SEO […]

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I like to keep things simple when it comes to building quality links. If you make link building too complicated, you can often over analyze and overthink things that you don’t get much done.

Most of my quality links have come from applying these two simple principles.

Connecting

I like what Aaron Wall at SEO Book said about link building. He said you should think of links in terms of social connections. The better connected you are to influential webmasters, the more quality links you’ll build.

Therefore, you should be connecting regularly with the webmasters of the quality sites in your niche.

Too many bloggers have the mindset of “build it and they will come”. In most cases though, it doesn’t matter how awesome your blog, you need to let others know about it because there are so many websites on the net. How will anyone find out about your blog unless you tell others about it? But if you get the attention of other webmasters, they will often promote your blog if you have content that adds a lot of value to the industry.

Moreover, many webmasters with quality sites are busy and don’t have time to keep up with all content in the niche.  Therefore, you’ll need to contact them directly to get their attention.

Especially in the beginning of your blog, you’ll need to make yourself known by connecting with other bloggers. Here are some ideas to consider:

  • Introduce yourself to other bloggers and tell them about your blog. If you have good content, many of them will add you to their RSS reader and they may link to you in the future.
  • Send them a guest post.
  • Create something really good.  Content that is unique and comprehensive is the best.  Then, contact bloggers and ask them to link to it if they like it.  Don’t be shy. Most bloggers don’t mind a little bit of self promotion as long as you have quality content and don’t overdo the promotion.

Content

It’s not enough to have the right connections, you also need to provide something to attract the link. This is usually content.

There are many ways to do this – from in-depth resources on your sites to interesting guest posts on other blogs – but the main thing to keep in mind is to keep the quality very high.

Consider guest posts. Many of my guest posts used to get ignored until I started putting more into each guest post. My motto now is that every guest post should be better than the posts on my blog.  Leo Babauta of Zen Habits has excellent content on his blog of over 100,000 RSS subscribers, but I think his guest posts are actually higher quality.

Quality sites have quality content so you will need the same kind of content for them to link to you or for them to publish your guest post.

By connecting with other webmasters and producing high quality content, you should be able to build quality links.  Now while these two principles are simple to understand, they do take hard work to apply in real life.  But just stay consistent and focused with your link building efforts.  In time, you’ll enjoy top rankings and huge increases in traffic.

If you don’t have time to apply either of these principles, consider our link building service.

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In Link Building, Quality Trumps Quantity http://performancing.com/in-link-building-quality-trumps-quantity/ http://performancing.com/in-link-building-quality-trumps-quantity/#comments Sun, 09 Aug 2009 17:47:40 +0000 http://performancing.com/?p=6406 One of the misconceptions many bloggers have about SEO is the more links, the better. This statement is misleading because not all links are created equal.  As I do SEO work for Performancing Services, I often come across sites with a low number of links doing well on the search engines.  These sites outrank their […]

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One of the misconceptions many bloggers have about SEO is the more links, the better. This statement is misleading because not all links are created equal.  As I do SEO work for Performancing Services, I often come across sites with a low number of links doing well on the search engines.  These sites outrank their competitors who have much more links than them.  How is this possible?

This is possible because Google puts much more weight on the quality of links over the quantity.

Now much can said about determining the quality of any given link, but that’s for another post.  For the purposes of simplicity, let’s just say a quality link is a link from a quality site.  Therefore, a link from about.com is much more effective than a link from some obscure site that no one knows about.

This should be great news to you as a blogger, since you actually don’t need that many links to do well on the search results.  Too many bloggers have been discouraged by the difficulty of link building.  They build their first two or three links and it takes them much longer than they had estimated.  They stop building links because they believe they don’t have the time to build a lot of links every month.

However, if they had realized that quality was the name of the game instead of quantity, they could’ve continued and just made sure they only targeted quality links.  Acquiring two or three quality links a month can pay big dividends.  Even one link per month puts you ahead of most of your competition.

On the other hand, other bloggers who went after low quality links have found that link building didn’t give them the rankings they wanted.  But if they had realized that quality trumps quantity, they could’ve spent their resources in a more effective manner and improved their rankings.

One of our link building clients works in a very competitive but lucrative industry.  They wanted us to target a couple of keywords.  We analyzed their competition, or the top ten ranking sites for the keywords, and realized we had our work cut out for us.  Most of the top ten sites had a lot more links than our client’s site. Also, the competing sites were much older, which adds to the difficulty of ranking since age is huge factor for Google.  Our client’s site was only two years old while the other sites had many years on their belt.

With only a limited budget, we knew we had to make every link count.  We devised a plan that had us building 10-15 links a month.  In just four months, we’ve seen our client’s site break through to the top 10 of Google for three of their keywords.  These rankings have brought a lot of profits to our client.

There is much more to say about building quality links, so I’ll turn it over to you.  What questions do you have about link building?

Also, if you don’t have time to do link building, feel free to use our link building service.

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